Hybrid Horsemanhip
Phone :253-444-8946 Email: byershorsemanship@gmail.com

What are the Working Equitation Obstacles?

Description. The bridge should be made of wood and be solidly constructed to ensure that it is not a danger for the horse or rider. The deck of the bridge must not be slippery. The bridge may be arched or angled in its rise. Recommended dimensions are minimum width: 1.5 m (5 ft); minimum length: 4 m (13 ft); minimum height: 20 cm (8 in.). The bridge may have side rails. If side rails are used, for safety considerations the rails must be constructed such that they can be quickly and easily removed without the use of tools. Side rails should be between 91 cm (3 ft.) and 1.2 m (4 ft.) in height. Execution. The bridge must be crossed at a walk in the Ease of Handling phase for all levels. The bridge may be crossed in both directions provided that there is one obstacle in between the first and second crossing.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the transition to the walk, the quality and regularity of the walk, the straightness of the horse going over the bridge, and the confidence of the horse and rider while navigating this obstacle. Points will be deducted if a horse shows any awkwardness, hesitation, or irregularity.

Description. Two drums (or similar upright items) are placed 3m (10 ft) apart on center.

Execution. The horse performs a circle around the right hand drum. Upon completing the turn, halfway between the drums, the horse will change direction and begin a circle of the same diameter around the left hand drum. When completing the second circle, the horse must pass between the drums to exit the obstacle. The circles must be uniform in size with the change of lead and/or bend on-center between the drums. A circle size of 3m represents the highest degree of execution. The Advanced (L6) and Masters (L7) levels may be required to rein back through the obstacle after the initial circuits in the forward direction. The first circuit in reverse must circle the drum on the right. If this option is included, it must be indicated on the course map.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the straightness of the approach to the obstacle; correctness of the horse’s posture during the change of lead; the passage half way between the drums; the shape, symmetry, and precision of the circles; and the horse’s response to the aids. A lower score will be given if the change of lead and/or change of bend are not centered between the drums. A negative mark will be given if the rider fails to perform a change of lead or if a drum is knocked over.

Description. This obstacle consists of a round enclosure approximately 6 m (20 ft) in diameter, with an entrance 1.5-m (5-ft) wide. Inside the round enclosure is a smaller round fenced enclosure 3 m (10 ft) in diameter meant to simulate a livestock pen. The inner pen may have small animals or statuary placed inside of the enclosure. The corridor around the livestock pen should be 1.5-m (5-ft) wide.

Execution. The horse should enter the obstacle at the prescribed gait according to level in one direction, exit the obstacle, change direction, and re-enter the obstacle going in the opposite direction. The course designer or Judge may indicate the initial direction or leave it to the rider’s discretion. When changing direction, the horse will execute a volte, half pirouette, or turn on the haunches. If cantering, a change of lead is required.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the horse’s serenity and confidence, quality of gaits, and the rider’s serenity and use of aids in performing the obstacle. The turn outside the pen and change of lead if required between circuits of the pen are considered as components of the obstacle.

Description. A jug sits on top of a small table or other platform that is approximately 1-m (3-ft) high. A manufactured table is not required; a table-like platform may be constructed of common materials (e.g., hay bales, sacks of grain, etc.) The jug must have a handle.

Execution. The rider approaches the table in the prescribed gait, halts with the rider’s leg even with the table, raises the jug above his/her head, and replaces the jug on the table. The obstacle must be approached from the numbered side. The rider may stop at any position around the table as long as the obstacle is approached from the numbered side. The horse must depart at the same gait as it approached the obstacle. If there are entrance and exit flags for the obstacle, these flags are considered transition points.If the jug is dropped, a member of the ground crew will hand the jug to the riders competing at Children and Introductory (L1) levels. Novice (L2/L3) level riders must dismount, retrieve the jug, remount and replace the jug on the table. Failure to dismount, retrieve the jug and remount will result in a 0 for the obstacle. Intermediate (L4) through Masters (L7) riders must dismount, retrieve the jug, remount, and replace the jug; failure to do so will result in disqualification.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the manner in which the horse approaches and remains immobile next to the table without showing any fear and trusting the rider’s use of aids. The jug, when placed on the table, must remain upright. Any jarring movement against the table will result in a lower score. Intermediate (L4) through Masters (L7) level riders will receive a higher score for approaching the table at canter with a good canter-to-halt transition.

Description. This obstacle consists of an open-topped drum and a pole 2.5 to 3.5 m (8 to 11.5 ft) in length. The pole is placed in the drum, butt end down. The tip of the pole should be easily identified as such by a pronounced taper or distinctive coloring. The grounds crew, at the direction of the Judge, will place the pole in the same position for all riders. A rider may request permission of the Judge to adjust the position of the pole, but may only do so if the Judge grants permission. Adjusting the position of the pole without permission is considered showing an obstacle to the horse in an overt manner and is thus grounds for disqualification from the trial.

Execution. The rider should approach the drum and retrieve the pole without stopping or breaking gait. The horse should advance at a steady gait and not react negatively to the appearance of the drum or the rider’s removal of the pole. The rider may circle the drum once before picking up the pole, though this is considered less difficult than a straight approach.If the pole is dropped, a member of the ground crew will hand the pole to the riders competing at Children and Introductory (L1) levels. Novice (L2/L3) level riders must dismount, retrieve the pole, and remount with the pole in hand or receive a 0 for the obstacle. Intermediate (L4) through Masters (L7) riders must dismount, retrieve the pole, and remount with the pole in hand. Failure to do so will result in disqualification.This obstacle must be used in conjunction with Placing a Pole in a Drum (#7). The Skewering Ring with a Pole (#6) obstacle is not required but may be included in the sequence. When used in sequence with Remove/Placing Pole, they are considered and scored as a single obstacle. If other obstacles are encountered between them, they are scored separately (e.g., if the Remove Pole and Skewer a Ring obstacles are performed in sequence and another obstacle is performed before Placing Pole in Drum is encountered, then Remove Pole and Skewer a Ring are considered a single obstacle, and Placing a Pole in a Drum is considered a separate obstacle).

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the manner in which the horse approaches the obstacle, its reaction to the movement of the pole, and the relaxed manner in which the rider uses the pole. A lower mark will be given for any alteration of the cadence or change of movement. Picking up the pole in a straight line is considered more difficult and will earn a higher score than circling the drum while picking up the pole. Circling the drum more than one time will result in a negative score. Knocking down the drum will result in a negative score.

Description. The obstacle consists of a pole and a ring. The pole is taken from the Remove Pole from a Drum obstacle (#5). If using multiple rings, the rings should be set at varying heights. It is traditional for the base to be in the shape of a bull with the ring placed on top. The rings can be made out of wood, metal, or plastic and should be approximately 15 cm (6 in.) in diameter.The obstacle is used in conjunction with Remove Pole from a Drum (#5) and Placing a Pole in a Drum (#7) and may be placed between these obstacles in the course, but may have additional obstacles in between.

Execution. The competitor must skewer the ring(s) with the tip of the pole. The horse must maintain gait as prescribed for the level of competition.If the pole is dropped, a member of the ground crew will hand the pole to the riders competing at Children and Introductory (L1) levels. Novice (L2/L3) level riders must dismount, retrieve the pole, and remount with the pole in hand or receive a 0 for the obstacle. Intermediate (L4) through Masters (L7) riders must dismount, retrieve the pole, and remount with the pole in hand. Failure to do so will result in disqualification.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the manner in which the horse approaches the obstacle, maintaining a good posture and not changing the cadence, and the fluidity with which the rider completes the exercise. Any break in the horse’s movement with loss of fluidity will be penalized. Striking any part of the obstacle will result in a lower score. Skewering the ring is not nearly as important as the style/approach to the obstacle, the continuity in movement of the horse and rider, the correct bend, correct lead, and evenness of gait. Dropping the ring after picking it up or failure to skewer the ring will result in a lower score.

Description. The obstacle is an open-topped drum set some distance apart from the drum in Remove Pole from a Drum obstacle (#5). The drum in obstacle #5 may be used for this obstacle provided there is another obstacle in-between or a prescribed route away from it in the course design.

Execution. The pole is deposited with the butt end down in the drum. The rider may circle the drum once before replacing the pole, though this is considered less difficult than a straight approach.If the pole is dropped, a member of the ground crew will hand the pole to the riders competing at Children and Introductory (L1) levels. Novice (L2/L3) level riders must dismount, retrieve the pole, and remount with the pole in hand or receive a 0 for the obstacle. Intermediate (L4) through Masters (L7) riders must dismount, retrieve the pole, and remount with the pole in hand. Failure to do so will result in disqualification.This obstacle must be used in conjunction with Remove Pole from a Drum (#5). The Skewering Ring with a Pole (#6) obstacle is not required but may be included in the sequence. When used in sequence with Remove/Placing Pole, they are considered and scored as a single obstacle. If other obstacles are encountered between them, they are scored separately (e.g., if the Remove Pole and Skewer a Ring obstacles are performed in sequence and another obstacle is performed before Placing Pole in Drum is encountered, then Remove Pole and Skewer a Ring are considered a single obstacle, and Placing a Pole in a Drum is considered a separate obstacle).

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the manner in which the horse approaches the obstacle, its reaction to the movement of the pole, and the relaxed manner in which the rider uses the pole. Any break in gait or change of cadence by the horse will be penalized. Depositing the pole in a straight line will earn a higher score than circling the drum. Circling the drum more than one time will result in a negative score. Knocking down the drum will result in a negative score. Placing the tip end of the pole in the drum will receive a negative score.

Description. This obstacle consists of two bending poles that are approximately 2 m (6.5 ft) in height, with an exterior base not secured in the ground. The poles are set 1.2 m (4 ft) apart. A drinking glass is placed upside down on the tip of one of the poles.

Execution. The horse and rider approach the obstacle at the prescribed gait and halt. The rider removes the glass from the pole where it is set, places it on the other pole, and then immediately exits the obstacle at the prescribed gait.If the glass is dropped, a member of the ground crew will hand the glass to the riders competing at Children and Introductory (L1) levels. Novice level (L2/L3) riders must dismount, retrieve the glass, and remount with the glass in hand or receive a 0 for the obstacle. Intermediate (L4) through Masters (L7) riders must dismount, retrieve the glass, and remount with the glass in hand. Failure to do so will result in disqualification.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the horse’s attitude, calmness, straightness, and collection; the immobility of the horse, the rider’s use of aids; and the fluidity, continuity, and quality of performance. Points will be awarded for the horse’s immobility when switching the glass from one pole to another, and its immediate exit from the obstacle at the prescribed gait. The transition should be smooth, uphill, and come from the haunches. The horse should not “jump” forward. Dropping the glass will result in lower score.

Description. A corridor is made from two parallel rails resting on supports, small fences, or walls at least 30 cm (12 in.) in height. The supports are not secured in the ground. The rails are approximately 3.7-m (12-ft) long and 1.5 m (5-ft) apart. A bell is placed 2-m (6.5-ft) high at the end of the corridor. The support holding the bell is placed so that the bell hangs in center of the corridor.

Execution. The horse and rider enter the corridor at the prescribed gait for the level and halt at the end of the corridor. The rider rings the bell and reins back through the corridor. The obstacle is completed when the front of the horse clears the obstacle and transition markers (if present).

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the horse’s attitude, straightness, gait, and collection; the immobility of the horse at the bell; the rider’s use of aids; and the fluidity, continuity, and quality of the performance. A higher score will be awarded for performing the obstacle well at the canter rather than at walk when allowed. The Judge will give a lower mark to a horse that drags its feet during the rein back. The Judge will give a lower mark if a horse touches the rails, and a negative mark if the horse displaces or knocks down any of the rails or if the horse steps over the rails. Failure of the horse to remain still will be penalized. Failure of the rider to ring the bell will result in disqualification. Exiting the bell end of the corridor with all four feet will result in a disqualification.

Description. This obstacle consists of an L-shaped corridor made from parallel rails resting on supports, small fences, or walls at least 30 cm (12 in.) in height. The bend of the “L” may be in either direction. The supports are not secured in the ground. The rails are approximately 3.7-m (12-ft) long and 1.5-m (5-ft) apart for Novice (L2/L3) and Intermediate (L4/L5) riders, and 1.2-m (4-ft) apart for Advanced (L6) and Masters (L7) riders. There are two variations to this obstacle:

  1. (1)  A bell is placed 2-m (6.5-ft) high at the end of the corridor (identical to obstacle #9).
  2. (2)  Two bending poles are at the end of the corridor, one on each side. A glass is placed upside down on each of the poles. There is a second set of bending poles at the entrance to the obstacle.

ExecutionThe horse and rider enter the corridor at the prescribed gait for the level and halt at the end of the corridor. Depending on the configuration, the rider either:

  1. (1)  Rings the bell and backs down the “L” corridor to exit the obstacle, or
  2. (2)  Removes the glass and backs down the “L” corridor. Upon exiting, the rider haltsand places the glass on the pole at the entrance corresponding with the side from which the glass was removed.

If the glass is dropped, the rider must dismount, retrieve, remount, and place the glass. If the pole that the glass is to be placed on is knocked down, riders must dismount, reset the pole, remount, and place the glass on the pole. Failure to replace the glass on the designated pole will result in disqualification.

This obstacle is not used for Children or Introductory (L1) levels.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the fluidity of the horse’s movements and its response to the use of the aids, enabling the route to be performed with maximum smoothness and accuracy. The Judge should consider the quality of the halt transition. The horse should remain immobile in the halt; failure to do so should result in a negative mark. Bumping any part of the obstacle without knocking it over will result in a lower score. Knocking over any part of the obstacle will result in a negative score. The Judge will give a lower mark to a horse that drags its feet during the rein back.Failure of the rider to ring the bell will result in disqualification.
Exiting the corridor on the destination end with all four feet is a disqualification.

Description. Two parallel lines of three posts each create a 1.5-m (5-ft- wide) corridor. The posts in each line are separated a minimum of 2.5 m (8 ft) from each other, and are aligned with the posts on the other line. A glass is placed upside down on the tip of each of the last posts in the corridor.

Execution. The rider advances through the corridor and halts between the end posts to pick up a glass. The rider then reins back in a reverse slalom around the middle post on one side of the corridor from which he/she removed the glass and halts between the entrance posts to deposit the glass on the tip of the post at the entrance of the corridor corresponding with the side from which the glass was retrieved.The horse must halt between the posts, showing immobility when the rider picks up the glass from the post and places the glass upside down on the top of the first post. To complete the obstacle, the horse must rein back fully to exit (i.e., all four feet) from the last pair of posts or entrance flags if included.If the glass is dropped, Novice (L2/L3) riders must dismount, retrieve the glass, remount with the glass in hand, and replace it on the post or receive a 0 for the obstacle. Intermediate (L4) through Masters (L7) riders must dismount, retrieve, remount, and place the glass or be disqualified. If the post that the glass is to be placed on is knocked down, Novice riders have the option of dismounting, resetting the post, remounting, and replacing the glass, or receive a 0 for the obstacle. Intermediate through Masters riders must dismount, reset the post, remount, and place the glass on the post.This obstacle is not performed at the Children or Introductory (L1) levels. At the Novice (L2/L3) levels, the horse and rider rein back straight between the posts without performing a slalom.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge should consider the quality of the gait and the halt transition. The Judge will evaluate the fluidity of the horse’s movements and its response to the use of the aids, enabling the obstacle to be performed with maximum smoothness and accuracy. The horse should remain immobile in the halt; failure to do so will result in a negative mark. Touching any of the poles will result in a negative score. Bumping a post without knocking it over will result in a lower score. Knocking over a post will result in a negative score. Failure to replace the glass on the designated post will result in disqualification. Exiting the destination end of the corridor with all four feet will result in a disqualification. The Judge will give a lower mark to a horse that drags its feet during the rein back.

Description. This obstacle consists of a minimum of an odd number of posts or similarly shaped objects (must be a minimum of five) in a straight line with bases not secured to the ground. The posts are approximately 2 m (6.5 ft) in height, and set with a distance of 6 m (~20 ft) between each post. Flags indicating side of entry are placed on the appropriate side of the first post or can be placed on the post itself.

Execution. The obstacle is entered in the prescribed gait. If there are not flags marking the exit of the obstacle, the obstacle is complete when the horse has broken the plane between the two final posts. The line of travel should be weaving through the posts rather than loops around the posts. Lead changes must be performed as prescribed for that level. Changes of bend and lead are to be executed at each change of direction, in the line and midway between the posts. The horse’s lead and bend should be in conformity with the turn.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the horse’s calm, precise action; fluid and continuous movement; quality of gait; overall manner in performing this obstacle; and the quality of the lead changes. The Judge should consider correctness and attitude during the change of lead and/or changes of bend through the horse’s body. Failure to perform lead changes and/or changes of bend will result in a negative mark. Late or delayed lead changes and/or changes of bend will result in a lower score. The shape, symmetry, and precision of the bending line, and the horse’s response to the rider’s aids will be considered. A negative score will be given for knocking down any of the posts.

Description. This obstacle consists of an odd number of upright posts: minimum of five; seven recommended; minimum of seven for Advanced and Masters levels. Each post is approximately 2 m (6.5 ft) in height, with a base not secured to the ground. The posts are arranged in two staggered

parallel lines, with a distance of 6 m (20 ft) between the parallel lines and between each post on the line. The posts are staggered such that the midpoint between the first two posts of the first line is directly opposite the first post of the second line.

Execution. The horse will perform half loops or turns of consistent size around the posts, in the direction indicated by the flags. Changes of lead/bend are performed halfway between the posts and on the line between the successive posts. Children, Introductory (L1), and Novice A (L2) riders perform this obstacle at a trot. The horse’s lead and bend should conform to the direction of the turn. 

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the horse’s calm, precise action; quality of gait; fluid and continuous movement; overall manner in performing this obstacle; and the quality of the lead changes or changes of bend. The Judge should consider correctness and attitude during the change of lead and/or changes of bend through the horse’s body, and the horse’s bend around the posts. Failure to perform lead changes and/or changes of bend will result in a negative mark. Late or delayed lead changes or changes of bend will result in a lower score. The shape, symmetry, and precision of the turns for this obstacle, and the horse’s response to the rider’s aids will be considered. A negative score will be given for knocking down any of the posts.

Description. The gate must be at least 1.3 m (4-ft 3-in.) high and 2-m (6.5-ft) wide, supported by two weighted posts (or jump standards) and two hinges. A latch easily operated from horseback should be used. The gate can be opened to the right or left depending on how the obstacle is set in the course. A rope between two posts can be used instead of a solid gate. A solid gate is preferred for Ease of Handling and is required in A- rated and championship competitions; a rope gate should be used for Speed.

Execution. The rider will approach perpendicular to the gate at the prescribed gait for the level and transition to the walk as he/she approaches the gate. The rider then moves the horse laterally and halts alongside the gate. The rider must lift the latch, open the gate, and go through the entrance. When the horse has fully passed to the other side of the gate, the rider may back up one or two steps to close the gate. With the horse squarely halted, the rider will then put the latch in place to complete the obstacle. The rider should not release control of the gate at any point in the performance of this exercise until the gate is latched. The obstacle may be required in both directions providing there is at least one obstacle in between the first and second execution.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the horse’s action which should be fluid and without any hesitation. The horse should pay attention to and participate in the opening and closing movements without showing any signs of insecurity or disobedience. The rider’s action should be easy, precise, and free from hesitation. A negative score will be given if the rider releases control of the gate by letting go for more than a momentary adjustment of hand position at any time during the execution of this obstacle, or if there is any sign of insecurity by the horse or rider or lack of continuity (fluidity) of the action. Switching hands will result in a disqualification.

Description. The obstacle consists of three or four bales of straw (or hay) placed end-to-end so they form a jump at least 3-m (10-ft) across lengthwise, and placed between two upright jump standards. The standards support one jump pole just above the top of the bales, or the bales may support the pole. Any solid-looking natural object that does not exceed approximate hay bale size may be used (22 in. x 42 in. x 15 in.). If bags of shavings are used, the bags must be clear plastic. At B-rated competitions, jump rails may be used as long as they are the height of a bale of hay.

Execution. The horse should approach and jump over the obstacle cleanly, naturally, and with assurance. The obstacle may be required in both directions providing there is at least one obstacle in between the first and second execution.This obstacle is not used for Children and Introductory (L1) riders.
Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the manner in which the horse approaches the obstacle, the smoothness of the route, the lead during approach and landing, balance in the landing, and the bascule over the jump. Knocking over any part of the obstacle will result in a negative score.

Description. This obstacle consists of one or more poles about 3.7 m (12 ft) in length with a diameter of not more than 10 cm (4 in.), supported 5-10 cm (2-4 in.) above the ground. The poles may be arranged in the following configurations:

  1. (1)  Single pole
  2. (2)  Two parallel poles separated by at least 3 m (10 ft)
  3. (3)  Two poles in an “L” configuration
  4. (4)  Three poles in a “Z” configuration

Execution. The horse transitions to the walk at the flags indicating the entrance to the obstacle and approaches perpendicular to the pole. The horse’s legs should cross in a lateral movement over the pole with the pole between the horse’s front and hind legs throughout the obstacle. The course map may indicate which direction (right or left) the horse and rider must pass over the pole; when not specified, the rider chooses the direction. In the parallel configuration, the poles must be ridden in different directions. For an “L” configuration, the horse must be positioned so that its head is to the inside of the “L”.This obstacle is not used for Children and Introductory (L1) riders. Novice (L2/L3) levels can be asked to execute single or parallel poles. Intermediate (L4/L5) and Advanced (L6) riders can be asked to execute single or parallel poles or the “L” configuration. Masters level (L7) riders can be asked to perform all configurations.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the horse’s calmness, capacity to perform the obstacle, crossing of the legs, and the fluidity and continuity of the action. A bend in the direction of the movement will garner a higher score than if the horse is bent away from the movement. A negative mark will be given for touching or knocking over the pole or if the horse steps across the pole with one or more feet. The Judge will give a lower mark for a lack of crossing of the horse’s legs in the lateral movement.

Description. The ditch should be a minimum of 1.5 m (5 ft.) in the direction of travel (long), and a minimum of 2.4 m (8 ft.) wide. The ditch may be flat to a depth of up to 15 cm (6 in.) or gently sloping to a maximum depth of 0.6 m (2 ft). The bottom surface should be safe for horses to travel across. Flags must be used to mark the entrance and exit.

Execution. The horse should approach and maintain gait through the ditch naturally and without any hesitation. This obstacle is not used for Children and Introductory (L1) levels.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the manner in which the horse approaches the ditch, its reaction when going through the water, and the consistency of gait throughout the exercise. A lower mark will be given for hesitancy by the horse. A negative mark will be given if the horse steps backward before riding through the ditch or jumps the ditch without going through the water.

Description. The obstacle consists of an embankment of natural substance positioned not more than 30 to 60 cm (1 to 2 ft.) above ground level. A level plateau is at the top and bottom of the embankment; the plateau must be at least 2-m (6.5-ft) long in the direction of travel. There may be ramps leading to and away from the level plateaus.

Execution. The horse should approach and maintain the chosen gait through the obstacle naturally and without any hesitation. The obstacle can be executed in either direction. This obstacle is not used for Children and Introductory (L1) riders.

Assessment Criteria (EOH). The Judge will evaluate the manner in which the horse approaches the bank, the smoothness of the jump, the consistency and quality of gait throughout the exercise, and confidence in the rider’s instructions. Lower marks are awarded for hesitancy. A horse that steps backward before going over the bank will receive a negative mark.

This obstacle consists of three barrels positioned at the three points of an equilateral triangle with a distance of 3 to 4-m. (10-13 ft) on each side, measured from the center of the barrels.

Execution: The horse enters at a walk, trot or canter between barrels 1 & 3 and makes a full circle to the right around barrel 1, proceeds to barrel 2 with a change of lead over the imaginary line between 1 & 2 and makes a left turn around barrel 2, then proceeds to barrel 3 with a change of lead along the imaginary line between 2 & 3. The horse makes a full circle to the right around barrel 3 and exits at the same point from which the exercise began.

An alternative version of this obstacle is to reverse positions of barrels 1 and 3, and perform the maneuver starting on a circle to the left around barrel A and finishing with a left-handed circle around barrel 3.

The objective of this obstacle is to show ease-of-handling and the capacity to perform in tight spaces while also maintaining impulsion and cadence in the gait. Check your local rules, since at lower levels this obstacle can be preformed with simple changes through the walk and even trotting is allowed at the basic levels.